Criminal Justice Reform

We can’t justify the safety of some and not all.

Law Enforcement
  • We must clearly define the role of law enforcement in our communities as our police officers are being asked to do too much in the name of public safety.
    • End the reliance on law enforcement agencies to respond to mental health emergencies, homelessness, and low-level civil violations.
    • Police officers will be retitled as Peace officers and will be required to build relationships with the local community they serve. A minimum of 12-hours a year and will be required to provide quarterly updates to a state database to collect important information from the community.
    • A new joint task force will use the information to help solve investigations and take a proactive stance on identifying criminal organizations that work in the shadows of our communities.
  • We must invest in our officer’s training and response to community needs.
    • Increase the Oregon Basic Police Academy from 16- weeks (400 hours) to 700-hours and field training for 3 months. The additional 300-hours will include classes for Ethics, Trauma-Informed Engagement, Recognizing Hate Crime, Recognizing and Supporting People in Distress, Survivor Advocacy, Disability Awareness, History of Marginalized People, and Community Engagement.
    • Provide officer’s with necessary and ongoing training on cultural humility, implicit bias (including biases based on race, gender, sexual orientation and identity, religion, ethnicity, and class), de-escalation, crisis intervention, adolescent development, and interacting with people who have visible and non-visible mental and physical disabilities. Ongoing annual training of 24-hours of use of force and firearms training. 24-hours of leadership training for all supervisors annually.
    • Direct Oregon Police Agencies to collaborate with tribes for combatting the unsolved killings and disappearances of Indigenous Women, Girls, and Two Spirited. The governor’s office will collaborate with consulates, state departments, and federal agencies for data sharing and joint task force investigations.
    • Establish standards for use of force by officers that emphasize de-escalation.
    • Diversify the police workforce by creating a new background investigation process that provides clear guidelines and restricts disqualification discretion from background investigators. All candidates who have entered the background stage of hiring will be reviewed by a joint community and police agency committee.
    • Standardize access to counseling and mental health services for officers who have witnessed traumatic events or engaged in the use of force tactics.
  • Hold officers and leaders accountable when their actions aren’t in the interest of public safety.
    • Mandate criminal liability for civil rights violations resulting from police misconduct.
    • All officers will receive documented quarterly and annual evaluations based on criteria based on recommendations from the joint community and police agency committee.

Jail and Prison Reform
  • Invest in evidence-based interventions that will help youth and adults with rehabilitation options and transitional social services.
  • Safely reduce confinement practices and create new policies that support a continuum of care to rehabilitate. The reform in which cases require formal court involvement, improve community supervision to be supportive of youth & adult development to engage in the opportunity to live a productive life in society.
  • Create an Incarceration Equity Oversight Committee (IEOC) of judges, prosecutors, defense attorneys, and victims to evaluate judge’s sentencing practices and send recommendations to the governor to reduce sentencing through clemency.
  • Develop a strategy to release all low-level drug felony inmates in my first year. Transitional services will be provided prior to release and a career plan with services activated the moment they are released to provide them the ability to live self-sufficiently. I will direct the incarceration equity oversight committee to provide recommendations on who should receive a full pardon vs commutation.
  • Jails and Prisons will create temporary separate areas that meet the needs of individuals with behavioral health needs. A cultural, healing, and linguistic environment will be created. Trained behavioral staff and resources will be provided until the court reassigns the individual to an appropriate facility.

Probation and Parole Reform
  • Officers will be reclassified as Community Engagement Counselors (CEC). Position description and qualifications will be re-written to support candidates with a combination of education in social services, social and psychological backgrounds, and lived experiences. Training will be focused on evidence-based practices to assist with transitional services and social reintegration.
  • CEC’s will no longer wear police-style uniforms unless they are engaged in the apprehension of a suspect. Weapons for protection will be allowed but must be concealed.
  • Provide CEC’s with necessary and ongoing training on cultural humility, implicit bias (including biases based on race, gender, sexual orientation and identity, religion, ethnicity, and class), de-escalation, crisis intervention, adolescent development, and interacting with people who have visible and non-visible mental and physical disabilities.
  • Ongoing annual training of 24-hours of use of force and firearms training. 24-hours of leadership training for all supervisors annually.
  • Establish standards for use of force by officers that emphasize de-escalation.
  • CEC’s basic training will be increased from 160 hours to 400 hours.
  • CEC’s will provide alternate solutions for individuals to engage in treatment when a person relapses from a drug offense.
  • Diversify the CEC workforce by creating a new background investigation process that provides clear guidelines and restricts disqualification discretion from background investigators. All candidates who have entered the background stage of hiring will be reviewed by a joint community and police agency committee.
  • Standardize access to counseling and mental health services for CEC’s who have witnessed traumatic events or engaged in the use of force tactics.

Prosecution and Defense Reform
  • Provide appropriate representation for low-income individuals. Price match what the state will use to convict a case. Change the structure of success for prosecutors because currently they are measured by conviction rate. Over 95% of cases never go to trial and people without financial resources are forced to accept a plea bargain.
  • Absolute Immunity for prosecutors will be addressed by a new state policy that matches defense attorneys under Qualified Immunity.
  • Low-level misdemeanor offenses will be examined to provide alternate options for serving time in county jails.
  • Create new sentencing guidelines by the IEOC and revoke mandatory sentencing law.
  • We support HB 4005 B – Firearm Safety Requirements

This bill is in response to the murders of Cindy Ann Yuille and Steven Forsyth, Oregon having an average of 10 children under the age of 18 who commit suicide each year with firearms that were not safely stored and secured to prevent child access, Oregon’s per capita suicide rate and rate of suicides that are firearm suicides above the national average, the lack of a safe storage law in Oregon contributing to more than 22,000 firearms being lost or stolen in Oregon over the past 10 years, two-thirds of all school shootings in the United States from 1974 through 2000 involved weapons taken by the attackers from their home or from the home of a relative.